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Selv om dette er testfilming, så synes jeg det funker jævlig bra

I waaaaaaant iiiiiitttt soooo baaaaad. Elsker Deadpool :D

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Fortsetter under...

[ATTACH]148773[/ATTACH]

Verdt litt over 100 kroner måneden. Ulike teamer og masse gøy og litt skrot :p

Lootcrate.com

I samme boks var det t-skjorte (joki), comic, star wars nøkkelring, to posters, pin og magnet - tema skurker

I'm SO signing up for that! :D

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Annonse

I'm SO signing up for that!

Do it! Liten gave hver måned for ca 180 kroner :D

Skal du ha Hero craten er det 7-8 dager frist før de begynner å sende

ps: bruk gjerne linken, da får jeg litt rabatt neste crate, haha

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For de som liker Warcraft og WoW, og helst de som kanskje har spelt ut til siste expansion så vil jeg anbefale warcraft/wow bøkene. Lest i riktig rekkefølge så er de ganske fete.

Kommer også warcraft film i 2016, samt assassins creed kommer med film i 2016 også :D

Ellers så er Game of Thrones, Vikings og Sons of Anarchy god stemning :)

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This used to be the shit:

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voodoo_3_3500_agp_box_1.jpg

Men to be real, Voodoo 2 var the shit, 12mb x2 i SLI. Men Voodoo 3 var allerede akterutseilt i alt som ikke var Glide da ATI Rage Fury og Nvidia TNT 2 Ultra allerede banka Voodooen. Begge de hadde 32mb minne og om jeg ikke husker helt feil kjørte voodooen 16-bit farge.

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voodoo_3_3500_agp_box_1.jpg

Men to be real, Voodoo 2 var the shit, 12mb x2 i SLI. Men Voodoo 3 var allerede akterutseilt i alt som ikke var Glide da ATI Rage Fury og Nvidia TNT 2 Ultra allerede banka Voodooen. Begge de hadde 32mb minne og om jeg ikke husker helt feil kjørte voodooen 16-bit farge.

Nvidia Riva TNT2, Pentium 3 667MHz, 128MB SDRAM, 20GB 7200RPM "Western Digital"-disk.

Det jeg klarte å skvise ut av den andelen av konfirmasjonspengene mine jeg fikk lov til å bruke på "datatull" (jobber nå som godt betalt utvikler, etter en del år som sysadmin). Senere kom en Hansol 710p 17" CRT-skjerm (OH LAWD det var fantastisk) og en Plextor 8x4x32x CD-brenner.

State-of-the-fucking-art i 1999/2000. Nå griseeier den 2-3 år gamle mobilen jeg bruker min første PC på alle punkter.

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Nvidia Riva TNT2, Pentium 3 667MHz, 128MB SDRAM, 20GB 7200RPM "Western Digital"-disk.

Det jeg klarte å skvise ut av den andelen av konfirmasjonspengene mine jeg fikk lov til å bruke på "datatull" (jobber nå som godt betalt utvikler, etter en del år som sysadmin). Senere kom en Hansol 710p 17" CRT-skjerm (OH LAWD det var fantastisk) og en Plextor 8x4x32x CD-brenner.

State-of-the-fucking-art i 1999/2000. Nå griseeier den 2-3 år gamle mobilen jeg bruker min første PC på alle punkter.

Husker første gang i fyrte i gang pc`n etter jeg satt i ATI kortet og denne filmen kom, da var jeg sikker på at nå var framtiden her

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Annonse

Åssen synes du kvalieten på wheel of time måler seg opp mot GoT og LotR?

Wheel of Time <3 <3 sier jeg bare ;) Liker du dype, og beskrivende bøker med et helt "eget" univers vil du elske WoT ^_^

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Wheel of Time <3 <3 sier jeg bare ;) Liker du dype, og beskrivende bøker med et helt "eget" univers vil du elske WoT ^_^

Seconded! Jeg har ikke lest GoT, men jeg må si jeg liker WoT bedre enn Tolkiens verker. Mer å lese, mer hands-on action og magi.. rett og slett større.

inb4 flames ahoi: Jeg digger alt jeg har lest av Tolkien. Bare en smakssak at jeg foretrekker WoT. :p

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Seconded! Jeg har ikke lest GoT, men jeg må si jeg liker WoT bedre enn Tolkiens verker. Mer å lese, mer hands-on action og magi.. rett og slett større.

inb4 flames ahoi: Jeg digger alt jeg har lest av Tolkien. Bare en smakssak at jeg foretrekker WoT. :p

Jeg liker muligens WoT bedre enn LoTR, fordi den rett og slett varer lengre? Begge er magisk lesestoff, men WoT varer jo som sagt en del tusen sider lengre ;) hehe ^_^

Hadde vært magisk om de hadde laget en high-end tv-serie om WoT <3 :)

Forresten, ikke kjøpt dataspillet WoT.. sugde.. :-P haha

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Selv må jeg nok si at jeg foretrekker GoT fremfor Wot, rett og slett fordi persongalleriet er mer nyansert. Mange i Wot fremstår som svært ensidige og unyanserte(kanskje spesiellt kvinnene?) , hvorhen got har karakterer med mer spill og dybde. Synes jeg.

Disclaimer: jeg har bare lest de fire første i Wot så aner jo ikke hva som skjer senere.

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For de av dere som liker fantasy, men som også kan være interessert i historical fiction anbefaler jeg igjen Masters of Rome-serien av Colleen McCullough.

Fra Goodreads.com-anmeldelse av First Man in Rome, første boka i serien:

If I could have sex with this book, I would.

Nothing I write can really do justice to why I love this book so much. I've just finished it for at least the 4th time (most likely the 5th), and the series will probably serve as my comfort read whenever I'm in a book slump. They're great and awesome and a guaranteed satisfying read. They've spoiled me for pretty much all other HF out there, no matter the time period. Apart from Patrick O'Brian, no other author has seemed to capture an era so brilliantly with mere words.

The setup is rather simple: Gaius Marius is a very rich man from the Italian provinces with political ambition and military experience. But he lacks one thing: he's not a patrician, and in the very snobbish political circles of Rome, it's not enough to have the citizenship. You have to have the right blood in your veins. Marius sets out to best them at their own game. He marries well in blood (if not in money), he slowly accrues undeniable success in foreign wars, and he never gives up. By the end, he has been elected consul an unprecedented six times (a 7th term looms in the future) and rocked the established order to its foundations. From this point on, the later autocracy of the Roman Empire is inevitable. The immense size of their territory makes the contained ideals of earlier centuries impractical and unpracticable. Marius' willful prominence in a society that prides itself that no one in the Senate stand above his peers opens the door to other men with singular gifts. Cue Julius Caesar....

It might sound heavy and complicated, but it's really not. Learning about the evolution of Rome from republic to empire has never been so much fun. There is red meat drama with backbiting, dysfunction, cutthroat ambition, and soap opera passions. People harangue each other, commit suicide, are brave or cowardly, lead armies into certain slaughter or save them through cunning, and exhibit the ideals of Roman behavior or plumb the depths of immorality. I want to hug them, slap them, strangle them, lick them, and keep them in a special box with a fancy little bow to pull out and play with whenever I want a grand old time.

Why I Re-Read This Book Over And Over:

1) The Style. It's really hard to describe it, but I would liken it to Roman farce. They were a rude and bawdy folk, those Romans, yet also insufferably smug and pious about their lineages and onerous duty to be a shining beacon of light for the rest of the world. McCullough obviously holds these people in great affection for their strengths as well as their weaknesses. It all comes through in a style that is accessible while at the same time being illuminating. The characters seem impossibly unreal and all too human at the same time.

2) Publius Rutilius Rufus' Letters. This is partly related to the Style issue, but these really are a highlight of the book. A patrician with a grudging respect and love for Gaius Marius, he takes it upon himself to keep the perpetually-abroad-on-campaign Marius informed of events in Rome in witty, long letters written from the peanut gallery. He has opinions about everything and everybody, goes off on tangents, and keeps warning Marius that Rome's established order can only be pushed so far so fast. It's through his letters that lots of the "infodumpy" material gets conveyed in a way that's both entertaining and easy to consume. (Wish more authors would learn how to do the infodump so well.)

3) The Scope. The story covers Roman life from the heights of power in the Senate to the stews of the Subura, where Julius Caesar's mother is resident landlady of a tenement building (her dowry). Sometimes it seems there are more layers to the Roman social and political strata than stars, but McCullough follows characters from different backgrounds (from ossified aristocrats to back alley assassins) to paint a canvas of Rome in all its infinite variety.

4) The Arc & Theme. Marius begins as a man trying to distinguish himself by working within the existing system. When that proves nearly impossible because of solid opposition to him from the Old Guard, he upends the system to favor himself and what he believes is the best interest of Rome. At the end of the book, when the tribune of the plebs Saturninus demagogues a popular revolt, Marius sides with his old enemies because mob rule is not in Rome's interest. While he has fought endlessly for years to earn fame and recognition for his own feats, in the end Rome is supreme and must be preserved at all costs. No one man is worth more than Rome, because Rome isn't about people and buildings, material things. It is about ideals and a state of being. Try reconciling that with the need to feed the grumbling belly that is Rome while staving off restless, wandering barbarian tribes 800,000 strong. The theme of the book is ideals vs. pragmatism, and the men who adhered to one school of thought or the other, and the successes or disasters that resulted from those decisions.

5) Lucius ("Call Me Luscious") Cornelius Sulla. Saving the fangirlish for last. There's no other way to say it: Sulla's a sexy bastard.

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*liiiiiiiiiiiiiick*

While not quite fitting the alpha hero mold in the bodice rippers I read (you know,committing murder and all), he is a take-charge guy with that attractive evil/darkness about him. His very red-gold/pale complexion is a stark contrast to the demons that gnaw on him. He has no scruples about anything if he thinks it'll get him closer to his perceived destiny. His ability to do some pretty awful things without getting caught only convinces him that Fortune has got his back. He's acutely aware of his flaws when working close with Marius, but he also sees the Great Man's weaknesses and is determined to succeed where Marius fails since he has the blood and family ties that Marius lacks. The two men work together for the good of Rome, but a submerged rivalry is born that plays itself out bitterly in the next book. As this book ends, Marius's sun is setting while Sulla's is on the rise and eventual success is in the hopeful offing. After all, he learned from a master.

And if the stick-up-the-ass blue bloods in Rome think they had trouble with Marius, just wait until Sulla's in charge. But that's for the next two books. I really shouldn't look forward to another book slump because they really suck and are a downer, but I can't help but hope the next several books piss me off so I can eagerly grab The Grass Crown. Oh, when Sulla wins that crown on the battlefield, bloody and weary and riding a high of triumph and finally realizing his destiny... *fans self*

Ahem. I've gone on and on, but I really haven't scratched the surface of why this book is one of the best novels ever written about the era. Make that ever written. Period. If you have even a remote interest in the time period, you should pick this up and lose yourself in an unbelievable drama over 2100 years old. McCullough does the reader the huge favor of putting a wiki and pronunciation guide in the back of the book, which includes everything from geography to Latin slang, so no need to interrupt your reading to run to the internet. It's all there.

And believe it or not, you'll see that superpower governing hijinks haven't changed much over the millennia. They no longer wear those snazzy togas and orate so marvelously, but the players are still a bunch of preening, self-important, bickering pricks who need to be slapped with the Big Picture every so often. It's truly timeless.

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/74731477?book_show_action=true&page=1

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